A New Signature Setting: The Lash Collection

By Constance on September 27, 2017 at 12:17 pm

In an ode to playful minimalism, we’ve re-imagined The Lash into a new collection featuring ethical Diamonds, Sapphires, Garnets and Andalusite. These bright and colorful gems shine when showcased in our subtly asymmetric, surrealistic, signature setting. An instant classic for modern celebrations calling for equally expressive, interesting jewelry.

 

New Bario Neal Lash Collection Featuring Ethical Diamonds, Sapphire and Garnets
This season, we refined and evolved the Lash into a shiny fleet of endearing, enduring options.

With a wink and a nod, the Lash setting debuted last year with our simple studs. Created to showcase our collection of ethically-sourced Emeralds, Andalusite, Champagne Diamonds and Iolite, with a twist– moving beyond an ordinary setting. The Lash’s unexpected, balanced asymmetry shines as a solitaire, grouped into a linear design or mixed with other settings for a brilliant cluster.

“The Lash setting grew out of a desire to move beyond the classic prong or bezel settings and to innovate with something that plays to BN’s proclivity for balanced asymmetry.” -Anna Bario, Designer and Co-founder

The story behind the collection’s origin matches the luster of these incredible gems. We’ll begin our new favorites for wedding season– Lash Dyad, Triad and Linear Cluster rings feature ethically sourced, neutral-toned gemstones in fresh, energetic combinations. These sparkling jewels, harvested from beautiful locales with the utmost care and intent are ready to ride high as you as you toast to your new forever.

 

New Bario Neal Lash Collection Featuring Ethical Diamonds, Sapphire and Andalusite

Our Lash dyad, Triad and Linear Cluster rings include Champagne diamonds from Australia, Half moon Sapphires from Sri Lanka and Andalusite from Madagascar.

 

Kimberley in Western Australia was once so abundant in diamonds that it is the only location in the world where Ant Hill Diamonds have been observed. (Yes, diamonds were once mined by ants!) After these early discoveries and prospecting, a human-sized mining operation was installed and today the Argyle diamond mine is famous for producing the most prized diamonds in the world.

 

 

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Known the world over for its unique pink and red diamonds, the mine produces many shades, including the champagnes we use in our Lash Diamond Cluster Ring.

 

The Argyle mine is close to the end of its commercial life, due to close in 2020, the diamonds produced from the mine are bound to become even more prized and valuable. Because the mine is in one of the world’s richest, most developed nations, it is subject to strict working and environmental standards and regulations. Traditional families and elders retain genuine control and empowerment over the exploration and development process, with the future of the land always in mind. As of 2011, all mines in Australia must follow a mine rehabilitation program for creating another use for the area when mining has ceased.

As for our other sparkler, Sri Lankan White Sapphire, we did a deep-dive into the story of the Sri-Lankan white sapphire in a recent feature with Catalyst Wedding Co. In a nutshell, these are the most-diamondy-diamond-alternatives you can get straight from the earth and cut into these cool half-moon shapes, with close to no environmental impact.

 
New Bario Neal Lash Collection Featuring Ethical Diamonds, Sapphire and Andalusite

We use Pleochroic Andalusite from Madagascar for its hues of red and green, sourced from an ethical jewelry pioneer who spent time in Sierra Leone developing a traceable diamond supply chain.

 

We segue from the diamonds once mined by ants, to the only gemstone still mined by those cute, tiny workers– Ant Hill Garnets. As the name suggests, these garnets from the Navajo Nation are brought to the surface by ants building new colonies. The ants dig out the stones, carry them to the surface and then deposit them at the top of their ant hills. They are then washed down to the bottom of the pile and cleaned by rainwater, ready to be collected by Navajo gem hunters. Generally small in size, because the ants dig around the bigger stones and leave them put, ant hill garnets are rarely more than 1ct in size when cut.

 

Ant Hill Garnets

Our new Lash Linear Garnet, Lash Solitaire Garnet and Garnet Cluster Rings feature Arizona’s Ant hill garnets.

 

While we can’t vouch for the working conditions of the ants involved in this process, (we assume most colonies enforce rigorous health and safety protocols and workers are paid fairly) we are able to tell you exactly how these stones make it from the moment they are collected to when they are set here in our studio.

Being from inside the US, the stones are free from any issues surrounding conflict minerals and you won’t find a more environmentally friendly, less invasive mining process. We source our Arizona Ant Hill garnets from a true innovator in the field of ethical gemstone sourcing and production. Once collected by the Navajo the stones are sold to gemstone cutters and polishers, otherwise known as lapidarists, to be prepared for the jewelry market.

 

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Meet our new Signature Sapphire Solitaire- it plays well with everything and can be personalized with almost any gemstone!

 

Another gem proudly mined in the USA features in our new signature solitaire, the Lash Blue Sapphire Ring. Discovered by gold prospectors 150 years ago, these Sapphires are a sought after dark blue from Rock Creek, Montana. We adore working with different sapphire colors and shades, Montana is such an exciting ethical source, given it has the widest variety of color of sapphire anywhere on earth.
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Our Lash collection is colorful, playful, minimal and classic. Have fun mixing and matching it up!

 

In addition to being designed as suites or companions, the Lash Collection is designed to show off almost any of our ethical gemstones. Want to create a Lash Diamond Solitaire, a Blue Sapphire Lash Dyad Cluster or an Lash Linear Emerald Ring? Just fill out our Custom Design Questionnaire with your idea for Personalization and we’ll get back to you right away. If you see something you know someone in your life will love, don’t delay– we make everything by hand, so be sure to place your Holiday orders by November 15th and the deadline to create a Custom ring is October 15th.

One of a Kind Aluminum Collection

By Jenny on February 16, 2017 at 3:55 pm

We are now thrilled to share our new limited edition Aluminum Collection. When first daydreaming of a new limited edition series, we challenged ourselves to create a body of work large in scale but also light weight.  The sculptural and airy bracelets and collar necklace highlight our handcraft as well as our exploration of new materials and processes.

 

Limited Edition Aluminum Collection

Our New Limited Edition Aluminum Collection

We modeled the pieces here in our Philadelphia Studio through hand-carving foam. We then collaborated with a local foundry to make sand molds for the aluminum casting.

 

Aluminum Collection Cuff Bracelet

Aluminum Large Cuff 02

Aside from the lightness of aluminum, our commitment to using only sustainable, ethically sourced materials, attracted us to the material. According to the Aluminum Stewardship Initiative,

Aluminum can be infinitely recyclable. 75 percent of all aluminum ever produced is still in use, with no loss in quality. Recycling aluminum uses only 5 percent of the energy – and produces only 5 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions – of the average primary production rate.

Aluminum Collection Collar Cuffs Bracelets

Aluminum Collar 01 paired with the Aluminum Bangle 06

How we gather and source materials while retaining Bario Neal’s signature style can be found in every step of the fabricating process. To view the collection as a whole, visit our Limited Editions page.

If you are interested in purchasing a piece from the Aluminum Collection, email inquiries@bario-neal.com to request to be added to the waiting list.

Bario Neal Featured in American Craft Magazine Jewelry Issue

By Constance on September 17, 2015 at 2:39 pm

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Bario Neal employs a team of skilled bench jewelers. Here, Emily Cobb steam-cleans a ring for the finishing touch. Photo: Constance Mensh for Bario Neal 

 

The course of true love is rarely conflict-free, but here’s the good news: The rings you buy for those entwined fingers can be. At least they can if your jeweler is Bario Neal, producing designs using responsibly sourced materials.  – American Craft, Good as Gold

 

We are thrilled to have an in-depth look at our designs, process and ethical mission in the annual jewelry issue of American Craft Magazine.

The entire text of this story will be available online next month, but is available in full with subscription.

Trunk Show with Top Notch Faceting on June 14th

By admin on May 24, 2015 at 1:57 pm

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Cool Tools: More Safe Studio Practice Tips

By Page on July 10, 2009 at 11:14 am

COOL TOOLS
Chemical Responsibility – Disposal solutions for the studio
By Helen I. Driggs, Managing Editor

Excerpt from the Jewelry Artist

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One of the simplest things you can do to lessen negative environmental impact is to reduce chemical use in the studio and select less-toxic alternatives for those that can’t be avoided.

The most commonly used studio chemical is pickle, and many jewelers are making the switch to citric acid pickle, a less-toxic alternative that is now available from major suppliers. When handling acids, employ proper safety precautions, and mix according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Citric pickle should be used warm, with proper ventilation, to reduce required cleaning time. It takes a bit longer than other types of pickle, but citric pickle is still quite effective, and many jewelers prefer it.

To reduce the amount of pickle you need, use a small potpourri size warming pot to replace larger crockpots. Jewelry items are small, so this little pot will serve most jewelers’ needs, reduce chemical use, and save money. When it comes time to change spent pickle, you will have less to dispose of, which will make it easier to follow proper disposal procedures.

When used properly, a pickle solution will work effectively for many months, or even up to a year before it needs to be changed.

To keep your pickle strong, avoid introducing baking soda into the solution. Be sure to rinse tongs, baskets, and jewelry from your neutralizing bath before returning them to the pickle. As water evaporates from the solution, simply add more water. If the pickle is weak, add more acid. Steel adds an electrical charge that turns pickle into a copper-plating bath. However, as soon as the steel is removed, the pickle can be used again as normal. On the rare occasion that the solution contains small steel particles that can’t be removed, it will need to be changed.

Continue reading Cool Tools: More Safe Studio Practice Tips

Safer Studio Alternatives for the Jeweler

By Page on May 25, 2009 at 8:42 am
Our Friends at the Society of American Silversmiths compiled a list of safer alternatives for a jeweler’s studio. We will continue to update the list as new methods are added.

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3M Radial Bristle Discs

Small-but-sturdy “bristle discs” are new abrasive products from 3M. 3M radial bristle discs, in 1-inch diameter, stacked together on a mandrel using a 1/8-inch screw, can tackle tough metal deburring, cleaning, and finishing requirements in the hardest-to-reach places.

Radial bristle discs are designed with abrasive-filled bristles that apply a continuous fresh supply of mineral – without damaging the underlying surfaces. Tough but flexible, these discs conform to the contours of the work piece where intricate designs, tubes or corners make finishing, cleaning and deburring difficult.

They’re also safe for the user, as they eliminate the dangers of flying metal wires posed by wire brushes and also can replace chemical use in some applications. In addition, their unique, patented design resists gumming and loading, so bristle discs work fast on soft or hard metals to produce a consistent, uniform finish. One-inch 3M radial bristle discs are suitable replacements for hand files, wire brushes, hand scrapers, and traditional grinding discs used for sanding, surface preparation, and coatings removal.

The one-inch 3M radial bristle discs are available in four grades: 36, 50, 80, and 120. Additional members of the small 3M radial bristle disc family include a 9/16-inch, as well as 3/4-inch size. These smaller discs fit mandrels with a 1/16-inch screw and are available in finer grades (120, 220, 400, 6 micron and 1 micron) and pumice for finishing and polishing applications. The 3/4-inch size also comes in grade 80. All grades are color-coded for easy identification.

Larger sizes up to 4.5″ are also available. You may find that Scotch-Brite wheels can accomplish the same tasks when using abrasives of these larger diameters.

These discs are worth a try. Most jewelry supply companies now carry a wide array of sizes and grits. Though their lifespan is shorter than traditional bristle wheels, they certainly have many applications including surface preparation for soldering and brazing without the need to remove buffing compounds. They are also excellent for removing corrosion.
Best deal on the internet: Santa Fe Jewelers Supply

Continue reading Safer Studio Alternatives for the Jeweler

Working the Egg: Oxidize Silver without the Chemicals (or the stench of liver of sulfur)

By Anna on July 11, 2007 at 9:54 am

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This is easy and about as safe as you can get. Hard-boil a few eggs. The number depends on how much silver you’re oxidizing, and how dark you want the silver to get. Place the hot & freshly boiled eggs in a container (this can be a plastic food container, a plastic zipper bag, anything that seals) with the silver you want to oxidize. If you’re using a plastic bag, seal it most of the way, but leave a crack for hot air to escape. Smash up the eggs, shell and all, making sure to get the yolk nice and mashed to release the sulfur. Then seal the container completely.
The amount of time you leave the silver in depends on the color you’re aiming for. If you play around with timing, pulling the silver after only a minute, or 10, or 30, you can get great variation in color from yellow to black. Make sure to turn the silver, or rearrange it in the container at least once during the process. Silver that’s touching other silver, pressed against the container, or coated in egg-white may not get evenly oxidized. Wash off the silver and eat or toss the egg. To remove the oxidation, pickle the silver in citric acid (see posting below), and scrub. Huge plus: your studio won’t smell like the sulfuric cloud that hangs over a paper mill!