Blog Archive: Metals

Where does your gold come from? A discussion in San Francisco on Fairmined gold initiatives

By Roxy on October 1, 2014 at 1:28 pm

Screen Shot 2014-10-01 at 1.15.07 PM

RSVP by October 5th for this event. Get to know the Alliance for Responsible Mining and Fairmined gold initiatives.

Event takes place on October 16th at 6:30PM at the Makeshift Society, 235 Gough St., San Francisco CA 94102

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Fairmined Initiatives Funding Education in Relave, Peru

By Roxy on August 28, 2014 at 10:21 am

We recently received a lovely e-mail from Ethical Metalsmiths to jewelers using FAIRMINED gold: “Responsibly sourced, fairly mined, fairly traded, transformative and fully traceable gold is no longer an idea, but a reality and you are the ones making it happen in the United States [...] What I am most excited about and think you may be too, is that the premiums you paid on your certified gold has been applied to the building a of a new high school in Relave, Peru. The use of the premium is democratically decided by a committee.” We are so proud to see the benefits to the mining community and their families. Images courtesy of Ethical Metalsmiths.

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Roundtable Discussion on Responsible Gold Mining Hosted by JA and NRF

By Roxy on July 23, 2014 at 1:41 pm

Aurelsa Fairmined Gold Ready for Export

 

Fairmined Gold from Aurelsa

We’re excited to let you know that Anna Bario, co-owner of Bario Neal, will be a part of a roundtable discussion on the importance of responsible gold sourcing, hosted by Jewelers of America (JA) and National Retail Federation (NRF).


“Gold and other minerals have been known to fuel unspeakable violence in Congo and the surrounding region, when mined and traded illegally by armed groups who use them to finance their activities.” says Holly Dranginis, Policy Associate at the Enough Project, a Washington-based nonprofit. “Jewelry companies have a major role to play in curbing that violence and improving the conditions for peace by developing responsible sourcing practices.”

You can register for the event here.

Fairmined Gold Now Available On Our Website

By Roxy on June 11, 2014 at 10:28 am

We are excited to announce that Fairmined gold is now available on our website in all of our wedding bands and engagement rings! Read more about Fairmined Gold..

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Fairmined Gold

By Alyssa on May 2, 2014 at 7:18 pm

This article aims to keep our readers up to date on the complicated and nuanced path towards ethical and environmentally-conscious gold standards. More specifically, Bario Neal is currently committed to using Fairmined gold and plans to offer Fairtrade gold in the near future as well. In this article we lay out the details of the Fairmined gold standards set forth by the Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM).  We also explain the difference between Fairmined and Fairtrade gold. Fairmined and Fairtrade standards and certification have the power to transform the gold mining industry, along with the lives of those dependent upon it. We will update this article as the ethical gold story unravels.

“Globally, over 100 million people depend on Artisanal and Small-scale Mining (ASM) for survival. The 15 million ASM miners work in harsh and dangerous conditions to produce just 10-15 percent of global gold supplies, but they make up 90 percent of the global work force in gold extraction. These miners and their families are caught in a vicious circle of exploitation [and] illegality, and many lack the skills and resources to move forward. However, if managed responsibly, ASM mining can provide a great opportunity for poverty reduction and sustainable development for millions of people.” [1]

Bario Neal uses 100% recycled metals whenever possible, the exceptions being our bronze pieces and certain findings like earring backs and clasps that we aren’t able to make ourselves. We are also well aware that regardless of how much recycled metals we use, precious metals will continue to be mined and continue to be recycled. In response to the social and environmental issues surrounding metal mining, Bario Neal has been working to expand our commitment to ethical metal sourcing and more directly support responsible ASM mining. Fairmined gold has only recently become available to the US market, and we are proud to be one of the first jewelry companies to develop a relationship with sources for Fairmined gold.

(Read More »)

“Ethical gold” aims to curb mining’s toll in South America, via Reuters

By Roxy on March 6, 2014 at 3:50 pm

An article about the Aurelsa mine via Reuters

Aurelsa, with 45 employees, made its first direct international sale in June 2013, a 2.2-pound (1-kg) shipment of gold certified as “ethical” by ARM, and it has exported another 22 pounds (10 kg) of ethical gold since.

While Aurelsa still sells some gold to middlemen, it hopes that all of its production – currently at 4.4-6.6 pounds (2-3 kg) per month – will soon be marketed and sold as “ethical gold”.

There are three other mines like Aurelsa in South America and last year they exported a combined 790 pounds (360 kg) of “ethical gold” to boutique jewelers in the United States and in Europe.

Miners at Aurelsa work in well-lit tunnels and take home regular paychecks, a vast improvement over other mines in Relave, a town of about 4,000 people.

Across from Aurelsa’s active mineshaft, hundreds of illegal miners dig without protective gear at La Capitana, an imposing hunk of rock that locals say has been mined for more than two centuries.

“In any one of those, you’d have to crawl to get inside, and you wouldn’t be able to see anything,” said Daniel Arcos, an Aurelsa engineer.”

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Development Diamonds; An Interview with Dorothée Gizenga, Executive Director of the DDI

By Roxy on January 8, 2014 at 12:41 pm

Dorothée Gizenga, Executive Director of the Diamond Development Initiative (DDI) speaks about the DDI and its relationship to the Kimberely Process in an interview with Ethical Metalsmiths. Excerpt below:

Photo Credit: DDI - Registration of artisanal miners in the province of Kisangani, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

EM: There is a relationship between DDI and the Kimberley Process. Can you explain the relationship and help our readers understand the difference in the regulatory aims of the Kimberley Process and the development goals of DDI?

DDI was created to complement the Kimberley Process, an international conflict prevention mechanism. We address the issues that are not within the Kimberley Process mandate. There are socio-economic issues affecting artisanal miners who mine diamonds in alluvial fields, where conflict diamonds started. We believe that conflict prevention requires resolution of these development issues, issues that will not disappear on their own without intervention.

DDI represents the first attempt to take a holistic approach to the challenges of artisanal alluvial diamond production, working with governments, miners, civil society and industry to solve problems that will not disappear on their own and need sustained support. Through education and projects working directly with artisanal miners, DDI seeks to promote better understanding and concrete solutions for issues relating to the artisanal diamond-mining sector.

The Kimberley Process is most challenged in the alluvial diamond areas, where internal controls required by the certification scheme are weak or non-existent. DDI is working with governments to increase internal controls through projects, and enhance the implementation of the KP through policies and project. After a number of years, the KP now recognizes the importance of development and its effectiveness.

Read the rest of the interview here.

Fairmined and Fairtrade Gold In Stock!

By Roxy on October 3, 2013 at 5:01 pm

We now have fair-trade, fair-mined gold in stock. Coming in 2014!

 

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Metals,Mining

Could Cornstarch Replace Cyanide in Gold Extraction?

By Anna on May 26, 2013 at 4:42 pm

 

New research shows the possibilites of cornstarch to to replace cyanide in gold extraction. The use of cornstarch could greatly improve the environmental and health impacts of gold mining and scrap separation. Thanks to Toby Pomeroy for sharing!

 

Recycled Metals

By Anna on June 25, 2012 at 3:31 pm

Gold smelting

 

Working with recycled precious metals is an important part of our process at Bario-Neal. We focus on sourcing the most environmentally and socially responsible metals and stones possible. One hundred percent recycled precious metals are the best option currently available, as they don’t require additional mining.

Our recycled silver, gold, palladium, and platinum come from two primary sources: Abington Reldan Metals, a refinery about 40 minutes from our Philadelphia shop, and Hoover and Strong, a refinery in Richmond, Virginia. These refineries take in scraps of precious metals, dust and filings from jewelers’ workshops, old or unwanted jewelry, silverware, silver from photo processing, as well as metals from electronic devices. The refineries collect, sort, melt, and refine these materials into forms that jewelers like Bario-Neal can use again, such as casting grain, sheet metal, and wire.

Our refineries aren’t only committed to producing 100% recycled metals, they are also invested in the environmental and health impacts of their facilities. We’ve visited both refineries, and we’re impressed with their advances in reducing waste and energy use. Hoover and Strong has been in business since 1912, and their recycled metals are third-party certified to ensure the recycled content. They maintain four large fume scrubbers to reduce emissions that cause air pollution. Hoover and Strong also uses the Miller Process (http://bario-neal.com/bn/blog/?p=12) to refine gold, which reduces acid use by 85%. Abington Reldan Metals is a LEED Silver certified facility, and they’ve been operating for over 30 years. They also use waste heat from the refining process to heat the manufacturing plant and for domestic hot water, as well as for the sludge drying and water evaporation process. This heat recovery has reduced their energy consumption by about 20-25%. Both facilities maintain a closed loop for water, meaning there is zero discharge and all the waste-water is treated and re-used in the refinery.

(Read More »)

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